Microsoft is offering upgrade version of Windows 8 Pro, the ultimate edition of upcoming Windows operating system, at a ‘steal’ pricing of $39.99. The price is more than 60% discount from the $99.99 Microsoft charged for upgrade version of Windows 7 Professional in the similar promo. And mind you, the Windows 7 offer was not even for top of the line edition, while Windows 8 is. In fact, $39.99 price tag is also $10 cheaper than the cheapest early-bird upgrade offer available for Windows 7, which was $49.99 upgrade license to Windows 7 Home Premium.

The $39.99 Windows 8 Pro upgrade promo is available for current users of Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 in 131 markets. Furthermore, it includes Windows Media Center for free through “add features” option within Windows 8 Pro after the upgrade which is otherwise a paid option, according to Windows Team blog.

The upgrade promotion is available until January 31st, 2013.

During the promotion period, a packaged DVD version of the upgrade to Windows 8 Pro will be available for $69.99 at local retail stores, as an alternative to consumers who not favor the download-only option. With the download-only option, user can create own bootable USB or .ISO file to burn to CD for upgrade and backup purposes. Alternatively, a backup DVD can be ordered for $15 plus shipping and handling charges.

Unfortunately Microsoft does not make the cheap price for Windows 8 permanent. The offer also makes the price of Windows 8 upgrade within the touch of upgrade pricing of Mac OS X, which Apple is offering at $29.00 a license.

The Windows 8 Pro Upgrade promotion can be ordered online via windows.com when it’s available.

For consumers who purchase new Windows 7 PCs through January 31, 2013, an even cheaper upgrade offer is available. They can purchase an upgrade version of Windows 8 Pro for $14.99 through windowsupgradeoffer.com.

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  • Appzalien

    Welcome back, I missed you!

    They could offer it for free and I still would not bite. As a desktop user who does not own a cell phone, laptop or any type of touch screen, I’m sticking with XP for now. DX10 DX11 DX12 do not interest me anyway (I really can’t tell the difference). I did purchase a Win7 family pack, but I never even opened it. As far as I’m concerned the Win8 debacle is designed to trick XP users to buy Win7. Microsoft proves again it’s Corporate Goons drive it into the next big FAIL.

    P.S.
    I have been looking at that watch giveaway for too long. I’m glad your vacation is over, for now anyway.

  • Gregg DesElms

    Wait a minute…

    …has Windows 8 even been released to manufacturing (RTM) yet?

    Oy. Talk about getting ahead of ourselves.

    It’s coming-up soon, though, I know. General availability will be in virtually no time at all, based on the anticipate July 2012 RTM plans.

    In my case, I still want to use Windows 7… preferably at least until Window 8’s first service pack. Therefore, I can see, right now, that I had better get ordered that new Dell notebook on which I’ve had my eye, because I want it to have Win7 on it, not Win8.

    If I do that, then I can always do the $14.99 upgrade through January 2013; and that, of course, is the least expensive of all upgrades. Dell may even off a free upgrade to people who buy a new Dell notebook starting… well… right about now, I’d think, given that Windows 8 will likely be RTM’d this month (July 2012).

    Too bad Windows 8 so sucks. I predict it will be as popular, in the long-term, as Win2K or Vista… at least on desktop/laptop machines. Win8 will, of course, be more popular on tablets and phones. The bottom line of Win8 is that desktop/laptop users will simply not like the “Metro” interface, and the removal of the “Start” button and the traditional desktop. Trust me on this: It will never be accepted as Microsoft hopes on desktop/laptop devices. On tablets and smartphones, probably, yes; but not on desktop/laptop devices. Mark my words.

    ___________________________________
    Gregg DesElms
    Napa, California USA
    gregg at greggdeselms dot com